© CAMRA 

CAMRA is a non-profit organization comprised entirely of unpaid professionals. We do not charge for SAR. We survive on donations and grants.
 

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CAMRA

PO Box 26478

Phoenix, AZ 85068-6478

Email:
info@mountainrescue.org


EMERGENCY: DIAL 911

‚Äč

(623) 252-5878

  

Fields of Operation

CAVE & MINE

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Abandoned Mines


Mines are not a place to play, ever. Any mine may contain "bad air" (poisonous gas or insufficient oxygen) -- or a sudden 200-foot drop-off -- or be prone to a cave-in at any time. Mountain Rescue has the goal to educate the public about the dangers of mine dangers. When it comes to mines..... "Stay Out, Stay Alive."

 

Rotted Timbers


Rotted timbers like these can be below you and you don't even know it. In some mines, you enter on an upper level and don't realize you are standing on shoring until you've been on it for several yards. As with many mine dangers, it is only after it is too late that you discover the danger.

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Learn From the Mistakes of Others


In one recent abandoned mine mission, two young men entered a mine ill-prepared for the dangers they were about to face. One of them stepped into a "shadow" and fell 30 feet down. He was lucky and was successfully rescued.

In another incident, the subjects weren't as lucky. Three young adults entered another mine in Maricopa County, but only two came out. The third tried to walk with no light and fell into a pit that was over 250 feet deep.

There are many hidden dangers such as rotted timbers that can be below you and you don't even know it. In some mines, you enter on an upper level and don't realize you are standing on shoring until you've been on it for several yards. As with many mine dangers, it is only after it is too late that you discover the danger.

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Caving


Mountain Rescue is a Cave Search and Rescue provider and meets NCRC guidelines. Statistically, the most common causes of accidents and injuries are poor judgment, caver falls, running out of light and improper equipment. This is compounded by people not telling others where they are going (into a cave) and when they expect to return. They have literally dropped off the face of the planet. There are several clubs that teach the safe methods and the use of safety equipment to use for exploring caves. An excellent group for directing people to the local organizations is the National Speleological Society (NSS) The club in Maricopa County is the Central Arizona Grotto.